mathematics

The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessment is the new standardized test to be used in all Illinois k-12 schools starting this Spring. It will used to assess mathematics and language arts at all grade levels from 3 - 8 and once in high school. The assessment is not without controversy. Come to the pizza lunch this Friday and find out why. Try your hand at a few sample items from the math portion. Learn about the development and implementation of the assessment.


NetMath is an online distance learning program of the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

On November 7th, the NetMath crew will give a brief introduction of the NetMath program, followed by a discussion on mentoring in NetMath and the Partner High School Program.


Educators are always talking about "what mathematicians really do." Fact is, they do lots of very different things, most of which require technical vocabulary and a lot of mathematical background

Around 1890, Georg Cantor invents a theory of infinite sets and shocks the mathematical world. Luckily, this theory is not only genuinely elegant, but doesn't require much background. So, it's a wonderful example for both high school teachers and students to show at least what some mathematicians do or have done.


Delta is a biannual international mathematics education conference. George and Debra will discuss some of the presentations there, as well report on the presentation they gave at the conference.


Want to test your math skills? Come to our Friday Lunch this week as Chris Cunningham, an Academic Adviser in the Math Dept, will be bringing a variety of different activities he has used in college classrooms.


Michele Crockett, PhD, will discuss the ways in which people think about formative assessment, what it may look like in practice, what it means for promoting high quality mathematics teaching and learning and how it fits into current US assessment policy.


"Is Algebra Necessary?", the title of a piece by Andrew Hacker (an Emeritus Professor at Queens University) in a recent issue of the Sunday New York Times is the topic this Friday. It came to my attention because Hacker briefly quotes me in the piece. Hacker argues that the algebra requirement for all high school students is misguided. Hacker's view is hardly new, but it raised quite a bit of traffic in the blogosphere.


The Illinois Geometry Lab is primarily a research organization that creates opportunities for undergraduates to work with graduate students and professors on cutting edge research that requires or benefits from visualization. From an engagement standpoint, our main focus is extension. We like to take what we develop in the lab, both skills and content, and make it accessible to our community.


The focus of this study was students' thought processes underlying their responses to questions on a statistics exam.  Two innovative measurement procedures were used to study the underlying processes: 


Natalya Zielnicki of Countryside School gives a MSTE Friday Lunch presentation about how art informed her teaching of mathematics.


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