teaching

NetMath is a successful online computer-based mathematics program based on the Calculus & Mathematica (C&M) project created by mathematicians Jerry Uhl, Horacio Porta, and Bill Davis. The C&M courseware was born out of the early calculus reform movement, which coincidently coincided with the launch of the powerful computer algebra system, Mathematica. This talk will discuss the authors’ thoughts on teaching calculus, and how NetMath has partnered with MSTE over the past 25 years.


It's been said that we are living in exponential times, based on how rapidly (exponentially) technology is changing, and how equally rapidly society is changing. What are the qualities we should look for in teachers to ensure students are prepared for the world they're facing?

Mikkel Storaasli is a graduate of the University of Illinois and was a student of Ken Travers, MSTE Director Emeritus. He is now the superintendent at Grayslake.


This talk will describe the vision and recent activities of the Institute for Sustainability, Energy and Environment (iSEE) for achieving excellence in interdisciplinary research, teaching, and outreach in sustainability, energy and environment. It will discuss ways for the campus community to be involved in activities related to sustainability and present a preview of ongoing efforts and upcoming events.


After almost twenty years in education, Amar Patel has found that all of the repeated efforts to overcome deficits in American education (No Child Left Behind, UCSMP, Common Core, etc.) all fail to overcome the singular issue that haunts teachers and school systems in America: You can’t learn math without spending time doing it. Amar will present what he thinks can be done about it, to those who could do something to help.


Dr. Mary Kalantzis has served as the Dean of the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign since 2006.

On October 16th, Dr. Mary Kalantzis will discuss multi-modalities in STEM teaching and learning and the affordances of new technologies.


Abstract: Preparation to teach school mathematics should include knowing how to respond to classroom mathematical interactions. Research literature of mathematics teaching asserts that teacher’s ability to respond to classroom interactions is dependent on her knowledge of subject matter and pedagogical strategies as well as instant recognition of what the student is saying. As a consequence, teacher education programs should cultivate teacher’s ability to respond to classroom mathematical interactions by practicing the integration of mathematical and pedagogical reasoning discourses.


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